The Winds of Time

The Winds of Time

Hauntingly beautiful, The Winds of Time is a powerful piece juxtaposing Middle Eastern and Western musical styles.
Commissioned and Supported By: VOICES Multicultural Chorus, Ithaca Community Choruses, and The Community Arts Partnership
Lyricist: Music and Text By: Sora Jederan-Shpack

As wind whistling a memory of love, so The Winds of Time opens to the sound of two beautiful neys or flutes in duet. With a text reminiscent of Rumi, and yet, so unique for our time, this dynamic piece portrays both the struggles of life and the beauty of the Divine. Using the opening material, the music shifts first from a Middle Eastern melody and chant to a Western hymn and finally returns to the opening melodic duet performed now by the entire orchestra or piano and instrumental obbligato.   

Product Instrumentation Price Duration Level Audio View Score Quantity
SJS-029-00
Printed Score
Orchestral Score: SATB, Orchestra and optional Middle Eastern Instruments 6:50 M Preview
SJS-029-00P
Licensed PDF
Orchestral Score: SATB, Orchestra and optional Middle Eastern Instruments 6:50 M
SJS-029-01
Printed Score
Piano Version Score: Piano, SATB Chorus and Duo Flute or Ney Parts 6:50 M
SJS-029-01P
Licensed PDF
Piano Version Score: Piano, SATB Chorus and Duo Flute or Ney Parts 6:50 M
SJS-029-02
Printed Score
Vocal Score: SATB and Piano M
SJS-029-02P
Licensed PDF
Vocal Score: SATB and Piano M
SJS-029-03
Printed Score
Instrumental Parts: Orchestral and Middle Eastern Instruments M
SJS-029-03P Instrumental Parts: Orchestral and Middle Eastern Instruments M

Text For: The Winds of Time

The winds of time play havoc with our souls
as they batter us against the shores of life,
And I, I seek, if only for a moment...
a brief respite in thy Divine Light.

allaah, allaahu, allaahu akbar

Composer's Note:

Allah (English pronunciation: /ˈælə/ or /ˈɑːlə/;[1] Arabic: الله‎ Allāh, IPA: [ʔalˤˈlˤɑːh] is the Arabic word for God (al ilāh, literally "the God").The word has cognates in other Semitic languages, including Elah in Aramaic, ʾĒl in Canaanite and Elohim in Hebrew. It is used mainly by Muslims to refer to God in Islam, but it has also been used by Arab Christians since pre-Islamic times. It is also often, albeit not exclusively, used by Bábists, Bahá'ís, Indonesian and Maltese Christians, and Mizrahi Jews. Christians and Sikhs in West Malaysia also use and have used the word to refer to God. Wikipedia 2015

Allahu Akbar (Arabic: الله أكبر) is an Islamic phrase, called Takbir in Arabic, meaning "God is greater" or "God is [the] greatest". Wikipedia 2015

English versions of the Qur'an used as study for this project include: The Message of THE QUR'AN by Muhammad Asad, The Qur'an: A New Annotated Translation by A. J. Droge, The Qur'an: A New Translation by Tarif Khalidi, The Meaning of the Glorious Koran: An Explanatory Translation by Marmaduke William Pickthal, The Noble Qur'an by Mufti Taqi Usmani.

Reviews and Responses:

For Reviews and Responses click on the link  A Mother's Love.